My contractor mortared in the hearth fire brick - I think a mistake was made


#1

I just had our oven built by a local masonry contractor last week. When I was re-reading the instructions today I noticed it specifically says not to use any mortar on the firebricks that are used as the cooking surface. I double checked and he did fill between the bricks with mortar. What kind of issues is this going to cause?


#2

No worries! While it isn’t ideal… it will be fine.
One of the main reasons you don’t want to mortar in the hearth brick - replacing broken firebrick.

BUT - this rarely, rarely happens, so no stress.

In addition - you will have wood ash and pizza guts all over that brick & mortar very soon, so… you will hardly see the mortar in a few months.


#3

That’s a relief…was a little stressed when I read that…Thanks for the reply. The guy did a really nice job overall.


#4

Your guy did an EXCELLENT JOB!

Please be sure to send pictures to the BrickWood Ovens Photo & Video Gallery

We would love to show your oven to the world!

Thanks -


#5

We are in the rainy NorthWest, so we are pretty up-to-date on the best weatherproofing methods… especially on a budget.

The BEST way to weatherproof your oven (which we recommend to everyone) is to simply cover the oven with a thick, clear piece of plastic sheeting. This can be purchased at most Mom & Pop / local hardware stores - for about $10.

That’s about as budget-conscience and weatherproof as it gets. It keeps all the moisture out - nice and dry inside.

To the second part of your question - Applying several layers of paint on the stucco is an excellent way to seal a portion of the oven, but keep in mind, as long as there is exposed masonry, there is an opening for moisture. If masonry gets wet, it will act like a sponge and soak-up the water (wicking).

So unless you can afford a custom made cover for your oven (every BrickWood Oven is different - so we don’t offer covers), plastic sheeting is the best and least expensive way to weatherproof your oven.