Firebricks on floor are wet after rain

I thought it was the chimney, I thought it was the door opening but I updated all of those and yet the back of the oven still gets soaked after rain storms. The only thing I can think of is it’s actually soaking through the oven, but to do that it would have to soak through the mortar, insulation, and firebricks…which doesn’t seem probable. How else could it be getting so wet inside the oven?

 It would seem more likely to me that it's getting in through the exposed firebricks in the front.then making it's way (pooling) to the back. I really doubt it's soaking through all the layers you mentioned.

Do you have a cover over the oven at all? I know the brink will absorb moisture, but there should not be “soaked” is there crack on your oven or a crack along where the brink or mortar meet your hearth? Can you post some pics to help us visualize whats going on?

So to follow up for a future searcher I painted the outside shell right after I posted this and it’s rained a bunch and the inside has bone dry every time. It’s weird but I think it was just soaking through and one coat of paint solve it!

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Thanks for the update, Ryan. The stucco (mortar) shell by itself will not keep out water. A veneer will add the necessary waterproofing simply because of the adhesive used to stick it to the mortar. If you don’t add a veneer, the stucco must be painted with a good quality housepaint. One coat as you did is good. Two coats is better.

As for being wet in just the back…that’s where a full break exists between the brick of the dome and the brick of the back wall. There’s also a joint between the insulation over the dome and the insulation on the back wall. So, it makes sense to me that if water is finding its way in, it will go all the way through to your floor at that location.

I’m glad you painted it, and again thanks for the followup!

2 posts were split to a new topic: Veneer vs. full-size bricks for finishing the oven